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Long-Term Process
The Lincoln administration and the Republican-controlled Congress had been chipping away at the institution of slavery since the beginning of the war, and the Emancipation Proclamation was a logical next step in that process.
 

Feb. 9, 1861, New York Illustrated News, p. 210, col. 2-3
“The Right of the South to its ‘Chattels.’”

Jun. 8, 1861, Scientific American, p. 362, col. 2
Non-interference with Slavery.

Sep 21, 1861, Leslie’s Illustrated, p. 290, col. 1-2
General Fremont’s proclamation and President Lincoln’s response.

Oct. 5, 1861, Scientific American, p. 210, col. 1
“Fremont’s Proclamation and the President.”

Nov. 25, 1861, New York Illustrated, p. 49, col. 1-4
Beaufort and Abolition.

Mar. 15, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 162, col. 2-3
Editorial on Port Royal.

Apr. 5, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 210, col. 2-3
Editorial, “What to do with Negroes once they are free?”

May 31, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 338, col. 1
President Lincoln’s proclamation rescinding General Orders of General Hunter freeing slaves in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

May 31, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 339, col. 3
President Lincoln’s proclamation rescinding General Orders of General Hunter freeing slaves in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

Jul. 26, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 467, col. 2-3
Senate discussions about employing blacks in the military.

Jul. 26, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 467, col. 3
Abraham Lincoln proposes a compensated emancipation bill to Congress.

Aug. 9, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 498, col. 1
Proclamation by President Lincoln
announcing confiscation of rebel property.  Also see sixth section of Confiscation Act.

Sep. 6, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 562, col. 1
Exchange between Abraham Lincoln and Horace Greeley on slavery.

Sep. 6, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 563, col. 3-4
Exchange between Abraham Lincoln and Horace Greeley on slavery.

Oct. 4, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 626, col. 1-2
Lincoln’s Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Oct. 4, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 627, col. 2-3
Lincoln’s Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Oct. 11, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 642, col. 2
Lincoln’s Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Oct. 11, 1862, New York Illustrated News, p. 354, col. 3
“A Proclamation by the President of the United States.”

Dec. 13, 1862, Harper’s Weekly, p. 786, col. 1-2
Editorial on Lincoln’s message to Congress on compensated emancipation and colonization.

Dec. 13, 1862, Scientific American, p. 370, col. 1
Lincoln’s State of the Union Message.

Jan. 10, 1863, Harper’s Weekly, p. 18, col. 1-2
Editorial on Emancipation Proclamation.

Jan. 17, 1863, Leslie’s Illustrated, p. 258, col. 3-4
Editorial on Emancipation Proclamation.

Jan. 17, 1863, Harper’s Weekly p. 34, col. 1
The Emancipation Proclamation.

Jan. 24, 1863, Harper’s Weekly p. 55, col. 3-4 & pp. 56-57, col. 1-4
Commentary and a Thomas Nast cartoon on Emancipation (includes description of a slave auction in Georgia in 1859.)

Jan. 31, 1863, Leslie’s Illustrated, p. 290, col. 4
Jefferson Davis’ Annual Message.

Feb. 14, 1863, Harper’s Weekly, p. 98, col. 4
Editorial: “Shall There Be Colored Soldiers?”

Feb. 28, 1863, Harper’s Weekly, p. 133, col. 1-4
“Our Colored Troops—the Line Officers of the First Louisiana National Guard,” illustration.

Mar. 14, 1863, Southern Illustrated, p. 2, col. 1-2
Lincoln as Dictator.

Mar. 14, 1863, Harper’s Weekly, p. 171, col. 4 & p. 172, col. 1-4
Great Union and Emancipation Meeting held in London, article and illustration.

Jun. 20, 1863, Harper’s Weekly, p. 386, col. 1-2
Editorial on the use of “Negro” troops.

Aug. 30, 1864, Father Abraham, p. 1, col. 1
An Acrostic (on Emancipation and Lincoln).

Nov. 8, 1864, Father Abraham, p. 2, col. 3
“Our Father who art in Washington.”

 

     
 

 

 
     
 

 

 
     

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